Time Management and Job Hunt Tips from an Experienced Preceptor – Interview with Steph Kamataris of ShiftChange.RN (Episode 60-Navigating Nursing School Podcast)

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Steph Kamataris of @ShiftChange.RN on Instagram joins us to share her best Time Management tips for nursing school, advice for how to land your dream nursing job as a new grad, AND the study strategies that personally got her through nursing school.


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Transcript for Episode 60

Hey there! This is Nurse Nicole, founder of Your Nursing Tutor. Today I am excited to introduce my guest expert, Steph Kamataris. Steph is the nurse behind the Instagram account ShiftChange.RN, where she shares content review and study tips that she has created to help all the nursing students and new grad RNs she precepts to feel more confident and successful.

In today’s interview, Steph will share the Time Management tips that helped get her through nursing school without having to completely give up her social life or job. In fact, she’ll also share how her strategic job choice helped her land her dream job as an ICU nurse immediately after graduation…and how you can do that, too! And since you know me, I’m all about coaching people on the best ways to study in nursing school, so of course I also asked her what study strategies and hacks helped her to get through school

If you’d like to read the transcript of today’s episode, or get the links for any of the resources I mention today, you can find them at the show notes page at www.YourNursingTutor.com/episode60 

Enjoy today’s episode!

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Nicole Whitworth  

Hello, and welcome to today’s episode of the Navigating Nursing School with Your Nursing Tutor Podcast. I’m Nurse Nicole. Today, I’m very excited to be interviewing Steph Kamataris, the nurse behind Instagram account, ShiftChange.RN. And we’ll have the link to that Instagram account in the show notes page for today. Steph has been an RN for four years now. And she started ShiftChange.RN as a result of all the preceptoring she was doing. So she decided you might as well start posting everything online for others to benefit from too, which I really love. Because here at your nursing tutor, we also have a mission to change the nursing culture and support upcoming nurses. And to do that in a way that can help as many nurses and future nurses as possible, just like Steph. So welcome to the show today stuff. 

Steph Kamataris  

Thank you. Thanks for having me. I’m excited. 

Nicole Whitworth  

Yeah, I’m excited to have you too. So we met because you were part of my free Facebook group. And somebody I think I don’t even know, I think she was asking about etgs or something like that. And you shared some of your content from Instagram, which got me attention, because I’m always on the lookout for new resources for the nursing students that I tutor. And, and so we started talking about it. And I know you told me that. Well, I saw first of all, tell me about your account. So like what kind of stuff tell everybody what kind of stuff you’d like to post on ShiftChange.RN? 

Steph Kamataris  

Yeah, so I started my account, I think last February. So it’s almost been a year. And I just noticed that nursing students and pre nursing students all pretty much had the same questions. I’ve been in these Facebook groups for a while. And it’s like the same thing kind of happens over and over. So I was like, No, I’m already making these. Well, not so much posts at the time. But like little notes and cheat sheets for the people I’d precept why don’t I just post these online, and then everyone can see it. So when people have questions, I don’t need to like, type everything out again and explain it. Like it’ll all just be explained in one like condensed link. So that’s kind of how that came about. And then I figured when I make something for one person, I could make it for however many people want to see it. So that’s kind of how the Instagram that started. 

Nicole Whitworth  

Yeah, that’s awesome. And that’s actually it’s funny that you say that because I started your nursing tutor when because I was doing like one on one tutoring. So ever since I was in nursing school, I was doing one on one tutoring. And I found the same exact thing is that the nursing students that I work with, they all had the same questions, they had the same problems over and over again. And so that’s why I eventually switched to this membership model to help nursing students because you can help so many more students that way. And, and really it is it’s the same kind of things that come up over and over again. So it’s easier to help people that way. So that’s really awesome. So, so you and you said you you got started creating this content, as you were preceptoring. So tell me a little bit about your precepting experiences. 

Steph Kamataris  

Yep. So I started precepting nursing students? Probably not I think I wasn’t even a full year in yet at the time. Yeah, they tend to give newer nurses students, just because they don’t want to burn out the nurses who are precepting, the new grads, and I thought it was like the greatest thing ever. I was like, Oh my gosh, this is so fun. I asked someone to like show everything to that and I was still new. So I was like everything so cool. Like let me show you everything and I also had like just recently graduated school so I knew like, like I wanted to show what I how I wanted to feel as a nursing student. Like as a nursing student. You’re kind of nervous, you’re like, oh, do I go bother that nurse and ask if I can watch them put the Foley in or if I can, like there’s just so many things that you want to see but you also don’t want to be a bother and you don’t know every nurse is like actually willing to help you and 

Nicole Whitworth  

Not everybody is as nice! 

Steph Kamataris  

Yeah, very intimidating. So I was like come on. I’m going to show you literally everything you could see. So that’s kind of how I started precepting students, and then shortly after, I think my manager saw that, I was very into teaching. And I slowly started getting new grads, I was only like a year and a half in. And I started in the ICU. So that was like, kind of a big deal for someone who was only a year and a half in to start, like brand new nurses. And then from there, they just kept giving me people. Oh,

Nicole Whitworth  

you’re doing such a good job? That’s, yeah, no, I actually find that out if they’ve ever heard of this or seen this in the research. But one thing that I’ve seen, it’s a problem in nursing school is what I’ve named the the expert to novice problem where the, the more of an expert you are at something, the harder it can be to the harder it is to remember what it was like when you were brand new at it. And so this problem happens in nursing school all the time. And you probably can remember it. Where like, you have the professors who are expert nurses, and they know how to think like a nurse, expertly. And then they have these brand new nursing students who come in and don’t think like a nurse at all. And the professors are all like, well, you just need to learn how to think like a nurse and just happen and the nursing students are like, how what does that mean? Exactly, and the expert nurses literally can’t break it down to tell them because they’re just such an expert, they can’t even it makes it really hard for them to predict what’s going to be easy. And what’s going to be hard for the brand new nurses, nursing students. Right. So that’s why I think like, people like you and me who enjoy teaching. And I think starting to teach when you’re, when you’re that close to being a beginner, yourself, can be such a benefit. Because like you said, it’s all still fresh and new and exciting. And then you can turn around and you can you can really remember what it was like when you were in the shoes of the person who preceptory 

Steph Kamataris  

Yes. and critical thinking is something that I hear most nursing students and new nurses say they’re like, I have no idea how to critically think and I’m like, you already critically think every single day. I’m like, Oh, it’s so true. I tell people that. Yeah, I’m like you didn’t cross the street today because a car was coming. And you knew that if you cross Great, then you would have been probably hit by the car. Now like, yeah, that’s not critical thinking. I’m like, Yes, it is. You just eat nursing, and it’ll come it’ll come with time. But yeah, already do this, just need to apply it differently. 

Nicole Whitworth  

That is so absolutely true. I hope everybody listening to this hears that. And I work with a lot of like, second career nursing students. So you know, people are going back to school after not being in school for a while. And, and I say you actually I tell them like exactly that. I’m like, you can think this way you think like this all the time. And you actually that life experience can give you a really big advantage in nursing school, if you know how to harness it. And that’s the trick, right? So, so let’s, let’s Can we go back and talk a little bit about your nursing school experience. And like why you decided to become a nurse and kind of what your nursing journey was like? 

Steph Kamataris  

Yep. So I’m also a second career nurse. I wanted to do nursing. So backing up to high school when you’re like picking your college, and everyone was like, you would be such a good nurse, blah, blah, blah. And I was like, I have no interest in that. Like, why would I do that. And like when you’re 18 you kind of have like an attitude, like, or at least I didn’t know what I wanted. And I’ll never forget this. It was March of my last semester of school about to graduate. And my brother ended up getting in a really bad ski accident. And he’s totally fine. Like, it was really bad, but he nothing crazy after the fact. But he ended up being life flighted to hospital near me in school. So because he was near me, I went to visit him all the time. And I was like infatuated with the different things in the room. Like, I’d be like, Oh, she just gave me a med. And now he’s like peeing a lot. And I’m like, Oh, I wonder if that medication like made him pee or like, like little things like that. And I was like, why am I so critical thinking? Exactly. I was like, why am I so into this? This is so weird. Then I was like, Oh, I think I want to be a nurse. And at that point, I was like, Well, I’m about to graduate in a month. So like, I think it’s a little late for this. But so I kind of pushed it out of my mind. And then a couple years later, not even a couple years later, like a year later, I was sitting at a desk job. absolutely hated it. I was like, No, I need to do something. So I became a tech at the hospital that I actually still and I did that because I wanted to make sure I actually wanted to be a nurse. So I was like, this is cheap. Like let’s figure this out. Unlike your first job you make, like no money out of school, I just took whatever job would literally hire me. And I loved it. I was like, alright, they’re gonna pay for some of my prereqs to get back into nursing school, and, or to like actually get into nursing school. Yeah, I had to retake so many classes because money in college and didn’t take the labs. So I needed to retake all those with labs and spending, who knows how much more money but I did like a year of prereqs got into school and an accelerated program moved back home with my parents really just like, No, it’s the grind for 16 months. Like, it was like a full time job. And then right after I graduated, I got a new grad position in the ICU that I had worked at. Okay. Yeah. So that’s kind of how I got into nursing and how I started.

Nicole Whitworth  

Okay, wonderful. So I don’t think you mentioned what was your first degree in curiosity, 

Steph Kamataris  

health, it’s called Human Services and rehab studies. So kind of like a health thing, and I minored in marketing, just to have like something else. 

Nicole Whitworth  

Okay. That’s always good, like marketing honestly, can help you in so many different ways. And now it’s like Ben so long that I like all the marketing has changed. Like you didn’t learn about social media back then. It was like, like, door to door marketing. And I’m like, is this Oh, wow, hold on. Like, this is weird. You know, I find that the fundamental principles are the same, though. Yeah, the best marketing treats people like real people. 

Steph Kamataris  

Exactly all personalities. Yes. 

Nicole Whitworth  

Yeah. So. So did you did you quit your job? Or did you keep working as a tech while you’re in nursing school? 

Steph Kamataris  

So I went like super per diem because I was working in Boston, but my school was an hour away. And where I lived was an hour away. So wasting an hour commuting was, or an hour, one way commuting was a lot. So I kept my job. I would do like maybe a full day on like, Saturday, once in a while. I didn’t want to overdo it. But I also did, like I babysat and did whatever I could to, like, make money near me. That was like, easy to do, like two hours before school and go to school kind of thing. 

Nicole Whitworth  

Okay. Okay, cool. So just kind of like odd jobs here and there and also keeping your foot in at the hospital. You had been working? 

Steph Kamataris  

Yeah, okay. getting your foot in the door is something I literally say to everyone, no matter what they do. And like, don’t burn bridges, especially in health care. These people they talk, they know who you are. Everything follows you. 

Nicole Whitworth  

Yeah. So be respectful everybody. Even when there’s crazy going on, be respectful. confronting it? Yeah. I definitely my nursing school experience was sometimes crazy. But I it also taught me a lot of skills about how to advocate for myself and my classmates, and to do it respectfully, always. And sometimes I got the results I wanted, and sometimes I didn’t. But I didn’t burn any bridges. Which is, I think, super important to be clear about. So how, what advice do you have? Like, how do you think, do you think that that, that you, the fact that you worked and kind of kept your foot in the door is that what helps you get your new grad position as an ICU nurse because, you know, any specialty getting a job as a new grad in any specialty is going to be super competitive typically. So what now i and I’m in the same similar position to you, I actually got a really competitive position as an or nurse. So I was an ER nurse, and I graduated. But I love asking people, how did you do it? What advice would you give to somebody else who’s looking to do something like that? 

Steph Kamataris  

Yeah, I hear this a lot. A lot of nurses are like, I’m just gonna take the first job that’s given to me. Mm hmm. I, I was just so not interested in that. I had previously already taken the first job that was offered to me in life, not nursing. And I was like, why would I do that like, that you’re gonna burn out if you don’t love what you’re doing. And being a new grad nurse is not easy. So you want to love what you’re doing. So if anyone who wants to get into a specialty, I think you need your foot in the door in a hospital to start. And I always suggest new grad programs because they’re really supportive. But I don’t really that you have to watch out because some places are like, you have to sign a contract for two years. And I’m like, Ooh, that’s a little catchy like why two years and I get like, like healthcare is a business so they’re putting all this time and money into training you they want you to stay, but I wanted a program that wouldn’t force me to stay somewhere. Although even if my hospital did, I had already work for them. So I knew how great they were. But yeah, so I applied to like to two other new grad program, three of them. One of them was the hospital I’m still at. And the other two were ICU programs. And I didn’t get I got interviews for them, but I didn’t get offered a job. And I was so frustrated because I’m like, I know like, I’m like I’m made for ICU. Like, when I was on my med surg rotation. I could not keep those patients like the med surg nurses love them, like I think med should, should be its own specialty, because I’m like having courses. You’re running around all day. I had, like, their names were like Bob, Ron Rob, and like something super like basic like that. I’m like, people apart. I think definitely having the experience in my hospital. They were like, Oh, she’s been here, she’s really trying to my hospital loves education. So they saw that, like, she’s trying to move up in the ranks. And she’s like, worked here while working as a nurse. So they knew my work ethic. They knew that like, I really wanted this, and it’s kind of hard to show people in an interview that you really want something without being like, please, like, I was like, give me a chance. You know, like, I just wanted to, it’s hard to prove that with like, backing up examples. So I think my foot in the door, they were like, Yeah, we know you, we love you. Like you’ve already been here, like, let’s do this. And I was like, thank God because I didn’t get the two other jobs. 

Nicole Whitworth  

Yeah, no, I think that’s awesome advice. And I would, I’m just gonna add two cents here. Because, you know, some people, you know, getting their foot in the door doesn’t always have to be a job because some people aren’t in a position to work. But like, the way that I had done it is it was through my clinical rotation. Like, I found that at the hospital that I ended up getting a job and like a new grad job in their new grad or program was because I had done it, we had done just like one day, it was the one day clinical rotations through there, or, and I found about found out about the program made a good impression, talk to the nurses there made it clear that I was interested. And they remembered me, you know, and then not only that, but then I also set myself apart. Because, you know, one day like he said, it can be hard to prove your work ethic if you’re only there one day just because you’re interested. But I actually called around area hospitals and I got shadowing experiences, because like you said I wanted to meet if I was going to commit to it, where I was going to make sure that that’s what I wanted to do. And I made sure to put that on my resume that I’d done the shadowing experiences to so that they can know that it was clear. 

Steph Kamataris  

Alright, totally clinical thing. I even like say to some of my students down like, you’re not doing clinical right, and you’re not doing yourself justice. If you do not know the manager’s name, or like the clinical educator, I’m like, go up there and just say like, hi, like, I bring my students by who are like, Oh, I really want to do ICU. I’m like, Oh my gosh, come meet so and so. And like, Let’s get your name in there. So I’m always like, do like, yeah, you got you go to do your care plans, your clinical skills, whatever it is baseline, but really going above and beyond is what’s gonna set you apart from in some hospitals 1000s of applicants, especially for yours. 

Nicole Whitworth  

Yes, absolutely. Absolutely. That’s such good advice. Yeah. And I think hearing you say that I think that’s good for people to realize is that there are nurses like you that are interested in educating that really want to help other nurses, like upcoming nurses succeed, and that you’re totally willing to help them out and introduce them to the right people and help them get their foot in the door, which is awesome. I was also I wanted to circle back to what you said about the contracts and making sure that you like, you don’t have to just take the first job that somebody throws at you. Because I’m like you I’m like floating around in all the different Facebook groups for nursing students all the time. And it always always breaks my heart when I see nursing students post, you know, I got this job offer should it’s only paying this much that’s less than I was used to make before I was a nurse or something like that. And they’re like, should I just take it and like, I feel like 75% of the commenters are telling them yes. You just have to take it because you’re a nurse. And I’m like, what the difference that like mentorship can make somebody because all you need is a good mentor who can tell you no, you’re worth more than that. You want to take something that you love. You want to take something that’s paying you what you’re worth, and you want you don’t want to get yourself stuck in a situation that you feel like you can’t escape from. I’m like you I don’t like being tied into two year contracts. Yeah. And and it was a good thing I didn’t want my program didn’t require that fortunately, but It was a good thing I didn’t, because I ended up starting that job pregnant and not knowing it. So that gave me the flexibility that when our first child was born, I didn’t have to stay in that position. But I, but the so the advice I give people now is that if you want to take a contract position, you can, but usually it comes with a bonus, and always read the fine print. Because the, there’s, there’s a way, they can’t force you to stay there, you know, literally for two years, but there’s going to be some sort of a consequence for leaving early. And so just know what the consequences and be prepared, like, keep that open. So like, if it’s a $10,000 bonus, and you have to pay the $10,000 back, then take that $10,000 Bonus, and just put it in a savings account for two years is honestly what I say. And that’s your escape ticket. And then if you ever want to leave, you can leave no problem. But if you do happen to stay for two years, you just got yourself a bonus. And it’s it’s all good. Right? So, so yeah. Okay, so that’s awesome. So you got the job? What do you think? Let’s get back since a lot of students who listen to this podcast are in nursing school. So you, you did a pretty intense accelerated program, I had done an accelerated program to what would you say? Were some of the keys or like, what advice would you give to, to second career nursing students who are going back to school to to do like an accelerated program? What were some things that helped you get through 

Steph Kamataris  

My time management skills? I mean, they definitely were pretty good beforehand. But now, like, impeccable, I refuse. Also, I was like, a little younger when I did this. So I think it was like 24. So I was still like, Whoo College, like, all the girls are getting together, you know. So I was like, I’m not, I am absolutely going to make all A’s and I’m not sacrificing a social life, I want to work a lot of programs say like, you shouldn’t be working. Your girl is poor, I need money. Right? Um, but I think people get scared, and they’re like, I’m not gonna have time for this, this and this. And I’m like, you make time for what you want to make time for. And I think that goes really everything. Not even just nursing. But if something’s really important to you, you will make it happen. And having a really good system for time management is going to help you. I at the time was single, I was lucky enough where my parents let me move back in because their house was 15 minutes from school. So I didn’t have to commute from Boston and then pay Boston rent. So did I want to move back in with my parents after living on my own after college? No, probably not. Yeah. And now that I’m older and have my own house, I’m like, I want to move back in with my mom, like, deal with everything, everything will be separated like that now. But I think if you can just nail down your time management and learn how to study at the beginning of school, because nursing is so different. Like To be honest, I didn’t really study in college much. I could just look over notes and go in and take the test. And I was thankfully, like, I could make A’s and B’s. And so like doing whatever else I was doing in college, nursing school, not so much I 

Nicole Whitworth  

very different, right? 

Steph Kamataris  

Yeah, I was definitely I was very lucky where I did well, on my first test, by the grace of God, I don’t even know how. 

Nicole Whitworth  

I failed my first quiz in nursing school. 

Steph Kamataris  

It’s tough. And I think the only reason I didn’t because they weren’t, they weren’t easier on us on the first test to like, get us into the NCLEX style questions. But you can’t get by in a nursing program by just reviewing your notes before the test I can good for you. Like you are like not even human. If you can do that. That is absolutely. Like I it was such a change for me because I was like, oh my god, I have to actually study and then I’m like, I’m not used to studying this much like, I like this is crazy. And then my motivation. This might be like a little like morbid, but I was like, Do you want to kill someone? Because you don’t know this? No. So go learn it and I scare myself into doing it. But then once I figured out like, Okay, this is what works for me. This is my study style. Just go for it. And then it might take you a couple times you might fail a couple quizzes, you’re not going to fail all of them because eventually you’ll figure out what works for you. But yeah, that first quiz that is going to humble you like when questions I remember like shaking taking my first as this is not straightforward at all.

Nicole Whitworth  

Yeah, yep. Yeah, I always say it’s because I have a very similar story to you. I always was kind of a good student. I didn’t feel like I had to study excessively hard until I got to nursing school, and honestly, some of my prerequisites to, I had to study harder than I had ever studied in my life. And it was kind of scary at first until I sort of figured out the formula, basically. And then once I figured that out, then I found the nursing school kind of gradually got easier, because, yes, you know, the human body doesn’t change, right. And so if you get that foundation of knowledge built, then you just have to work on developing skill of how to think about it. And that’s what I try to teach, like, on my tutoring students is that you have this expectation from your whole life, you’ve been trained, that you need to, you know, study the information, regurgitate the information on the test. So you’re studying what you’re being tested on. But a nursing school, they change it, they, you, they kind of encourage you to study the information itself, because they’re like, You need to know everything in your textbook, you’re responsible for everything. Which is absolutely ludicrous. Yeah. But then they turn around, and they don’t test you on that information, they test you on how to think about that information. Yeah, and if you continue studying the same way, you’ve always studied, you’re never going to make that transition in your head, to learning how to think about it. Like, that’s what they mean, when they say, to analyze, and you have to learn how to analyze and apply the inflammation, you have to be studying in a way, where you’re already practicing how to analyze and apply it. And, you know, given the the number of nursing students I’ve worked with over the years, I, I really do see, you know, people, their professors all the time, tell them oh, just keep working on it, it’ll eventually click, but what I find is that, you know, for a lot of students, it does eventually click like, for whatever reason, it, it works, but then there’s other students that like, it will click eventually, but it might not be in time to pass the class, right. And so for a lot of students, they can really benefit from having a mentor, you know, or a tutor or a coach, or like another nurse, who is not suffering from this expert to novice problem, can turn around and be like, Look, this is what you can do to speed up that learning curve, and study in a way that is going to help you like make it click faster. So 

Steph Kamataris  

Right. And I think that, like I used to just memorize stuff, right? Yeah, not even memorizing anything in nursing school, except for maybe lab values, because those you can’t really think through everything else. I’m like, if you’re memorizing how the blood flows through the heart, you’re eventually going to forget that if you learn, like, anatomically, the heart, and you’re like, okay, and like draw a picture in your head, or however works for you, but like, thinking it through you, once you learn that you can answer so many questions about anything on cardiac. And it takes a while to realize that and I’m like, Oh, well, I wish I had learned to not memorize way earlier because I was like, your classes just build on each other. So if you weren’t memorized first semester, well, now you had break first semesters out the window and you go to go to your first like, med surge class, you don’t remember your patho or anything. It’s like, you just wasted that first semester, because you didn’t actually learn it. You just memorized it for the test and got rid of it. Yep. 

Nicole Whitworth  

And that’s exactly what I tell people who like they say, Oh, well, everybody says that med surg two is the hardest class. And I’m like, it’s not, it’s because of exactly what you just described, like, you’ve just gone through one or two semesters, where you’ve kind of wasted your opportunity to build this foundation of like, knowing the A&P and how to apply it. Whereas like, instead of building each semester, you’re just starting over each semester. And so now that you’ve gotten to this advanced class, I call it studying on stilts. Like here, you’re trying to, yeah, you’re trying to cover this advanced information, but you are missing the foundation, because of the waves that in the past 

Steph Kamataris  

really hard for your brain to jump from, like a very basic knowledge to like, Okay, now you’re missing the middle and you have to answer your questions up here like that. That doesn’t work. I mean, you might get by for a little while, but you’re just the deeper you get into school, like the more it’s just not going to click for you. And then by the time NCLEX comes, forget it. 

Nicole Whitworth  

Absolutely, absolutely. Yeah, I totally. I couldn’t agree with that more. So, okay, well, do you have any parting words of advice or anything that you would like to tell anybody who’s sitting at the beginning of their spring semester right now just starting their nursing classes? Two to four words of wisdom from step

Steph Kamataris  

Oh, I like to tell people nursing school teaches you how to pass the NCLEX Yeah, they teach you the skills in real life, how to do them in real life, but school really just gets you to pass the NCLEX, your first job is going to teach you how to be a nurse how to critically think. So if you feel like you graduate, yes, you get to the NCLEX, great, you pass and then you get to your first job. And you’re like, oh my gosh, I don’t know anything that is totally normal. And honestly, hospitals don’t want you to know everything, because that everyone has such different policies and procedures that are specific to that hospital. So they’re going to teach you everything, and they’re not going to let you fail. Because, again, like I said, healthcare is a business. They’re investing a lot of time and money into you. And they don’t want bad patient outcomes. They want you to do well. And we need nurses at the bedside. So it’s like they really, they truly do. And there are a lot of nurses like me who want to teach, you just kind of have to find them. 

Nicole Whitworth  

Yeah, yeah, such good advice. And I think people really need to hear that because they start out there day one, feeling like they’re already failing, because they don’t know everything yet. And I’m like, you’re going to graduate, and you’re not going to know everything yet. You’re going to be a nurse for 40 years, and you’re not going to know everything yet. 

Steph Kamataris  

And it’s always changing to like, even since I’ve been a nurse, like the new like medical technology. And I grew up with technology. Like I’m very good with tech. I’m like, Oh my gosh, I can’t even believe this is a thing, like who’s coming up with this stuff. It’s amazing. But there’s always something new to learn. And that’s also why I love nursing, because I don’t like to settle. You probably noticed like by my page, I always have like different things going on. So that’s why nursing so great. You can always change if you don’t love it, something new is always around the corner. And just the fact that you’re going to be a nurse is going to open so many doors for you. So if one thing doesn’t work out, there’s 50 others. Absolutely. Yeah, that’s good advice. Well, thank you so much for joining me today Steph! 

Thank you for having me. 

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And while you’re at it, would you mind do me a 30-second favor? Would you go to Apple Podcasts and write a 2-sentence Review for Navigating Nursing School with Your Nursing Tutor? Simply tell me where you’re at on your nursing journey, and why you like listening to this podcast. It’s one small way that you can support the mission of Your Nursing Tutor by helping other nursing students discover that it IS possible for “normal people” to get through nursing school without completely sacrificing their family, their job, and even their sanity. 

Until next episode, good luck on your nursing journey!

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