Multiple NCLEX Failures, to Successfully Becoming a Nurse: An interview with Jenn Volp (Episode 57-Navigating Nursing School Podcast)

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Do you ever worry about what it would be like to pass nursing school…only to fail nclex (multiple times!), and lose a job because of it? But then to finally get the kind of tutoring support that spurs you onto success? Today I’m interviewing a former tutoring student, Jenn Volp, who experienced exactly that! You’ll get to hear what it was like for her while she was going through that hard situation, and what she finally did that helped her to pass NCLEX and go on to become a successful nurse for the past 5+ years.  


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Transcript for Episode 57

Hey there! Today I’m really excited to share with you an interview I did with one of my former tutoring students, Jenn Volp. She has been a successful nurse for over 5 years now, but when she first found me and Your Nursing Tutor, she had failed the NCLEX multiple times and wasn’t sure what to do next. She even lost a nursing job because of this situation, and was feeling really discouraged, but didn’t give up. 

Back when I first started tutoring Jenn, I had confidence that she was eventually going to succeed and earn her nursing license, because I could tell that she had the motivation and commitment that it takes to persevere in a situation like that. I knew this because when she first approached me for tutoring help, I had to turn her DOWN because I was about to give birth to baby #4, and I didn’t have the time or energy to take on a new tutoring client. 

Remember, this was over 5 years ago, way back before I offered the VIP Tutoring Membership that I have available nowadays, so Jenn’s only chance to work with me was to pay my expensive rates for private, 1-on-1 tutoring. And in today’s interview, you’ll get to hear her opinion as to whether she thought it was worth the money!

In any case, even though I had to turn her down as a tutoring client at first, she kept politely pestering me, in a good way of course, to tutor her, and so a few months later we were able to get started working together. And that is honestly how I knew she would eventually make it as a nurse, because if she was going to be so consistently relentless about seeking out the help she needed from me, then I knew she would be consistently relentless about doing whatever it took to study differently and prepare to retake her NCLEX. 

In fact, I still look for those same characteristics in the students who want to join my VIP Tutoring Membership today. Because I know that if you are that committed to doing the work, then it’s only a matter of time until you turn around your nursing school experience and see some big improvements. Or if you’re pre-nursing, you can avoid that whole situation and simply start out strong! 

In any case, if you’d like to read the transcript for today’s episode, or get more information about the VIP Tutoring membership, you can find that information by going to shownotes for today’s episode at www.YourNursingTutor.com/episode57

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Nicole Whitworth  

Hello, this is Nicole Whitworth of nursing tutor. And I’m here today with my friend Jen Volp, who was one of my tutoring students. It’s been like six years. Is that right? Jen? Yes, about six years ago, is when we met. And I really wanted her to have her on the podcast today. Because I always tell students that everybody’s nursing journey looks different, completely different. There’s no one right way to do your nursing journey. And almost always, it’s gonna have bumps and ups and downs and twists and turns that you didn’t expect you may not have wanted. But if you want to become a nurse, you can still do it. And Jen story, I always think it’s just so inspirational. I actually talk about you quite a bit in my students when I want to offer them hope. So Jen found me like I said about six years ago when she hadn’t been successful with her NCLEX. And I’ll let her tell a little bit more about that. But after working together for a little while, she successfully passed. And she has been spoiler alert, a successful registered nurse for five or six years now. So that’s awesome. And, Jen, do you want to talk a little bit about what you’re doing now as a nurse and what you’ve been doing since you got your license?

Jenn V  

Yes. So currently, I work in a family practice clinic in a fairly big city. And I live in Madison, Wisconsin, and Midwest. Yes. So I work with two excellent female providers. One is MD and one as a nurse practitioner, and I am doing family medicine, nursing. So that’s all ages. And I really enjoy the clinic setting. I really was attracted to it because my husband has some chronic illnesses. So I really like the stability of being Monday through Friday, no holidays weekend. So that’s really worked out. I’ve been with UnityPoint Health Meriter for believe in the next month or two it will be four years. And I’ve really enjoyed working for this organization. They really provide a lot of opportunities for girls for Teaching, Learning, and I really just have a good group of co workers. So that’s really been enjoyable.

Nicole Whitworth  

Awesome. And what did you do before you started with them? They said have been with them about four years. So what were you doing when you switched to that?

Jenn V  

Um, prior to working with murder, I was working in a private setting And I was an internal med. So at the end up working with one female medical doctor, and I just, I liked it, but I was wanting to move on to something else. And I really think I found the fit where I, I need to be right now. I like the camaraderie, the growth, the learning. And I also think that given the climate, one with COVID, that, like we’re all burned out as healthcare professionals, but I feel like the organization that I work with, recognizes that and also really tries to back and listen to us as nurses and what we have to say,

Nicole Whitworth  

that’s really important. I will say, I have a friend who’s a nurse consultant who consults with a lot of big hospitals across the country. And it’s surprising talking to her the number of big healthcare organizations that don’t listen to their nurses. It’s really sad, actually. So that’s wonderful that you found a great clinic that does listen to the nurses. So if I’m remembering correctly, did you start doing clinical work right away? After getting your RN license? Or did you work in the hospital for a little bit first,

Jenn V  

I went straight to clinic nursing I, I did some course hospital clinicals when I was in nursing school, and obviously that was I had to do that I enjoyed it, I think back then. But given just the climate, like I said, with my husband and all of his health issues. Up until this point, clinic nursing was quite a bit more appealing. I didn’t necessarily want to go to the hospital for various reasons. And I think at the point and the age I am in my life right now, I really think that clinic nursing is where I want to stay at this point. I do have maybe a few years ago, when I first started at the clinic, I was skeptical that I would lose a lot of skills, hands on things. Because I think a lot of clinic nursing your are triaging on the phone. So it’s really critical thinking, you don’t maybe get to do as much patient interaction in person. But that’s what I initially thought. But I’ve gotten over that piece, because I do talk a lot on the phone. But now I’m making like the connections, the relationships, people know me when I’m like, Hey, I’m Jen. And, you know, we have that rapport, that trust, we also have a lot of patients that, you know, can’t get into specialties can’t get into this or that. And so we do a lot of things in the clinic that maybe we wouldn’t do. I’m doing a lot of injections, a lot of teaching, I help with wound care, sometimes we do just a lot of different things in the clinic. So I’m not as concerned anymore about losing those skills. And if so, I feel like we have support if we need to, like refresh on on those. Actually, yesterday, I was supposed to give a virtual injection, and I was super nervous about that. And we were like extending the olive branch to this patient. And actually, he never showed up. So I was all prepared. I was I had additional support. And I was excited to give it a to help him maintain his you know, sobriety but also to get another tool under my belt. And then he didn’t show up. So I still feel like I have that knowledge. But like, that is not something I ever thought I wouldn’t be doing in the clinic. You know, we do a lot of various types of things that people don’t necessarily know. And so I think that’s, I think that’s refreshing.

Nicole Whitworth  

Yeah, that is that is really interesting. So I have two things I want to ask you to follow up about that. One is? Well, first, I guess it’s a comment. It’s just that so many people, I just want everybody’s listening to catch what you just said that you have been a nurse for like six years now. And you still have things where you still have days where you feel nervous. So I want other people to hear that. Because it kind of normalizes things, right? Like, I bet you don’t feel nervous all day, every day the way that you did as a brand new nurse, right? Correct.

Jenn V  

No, I feel I’m not using you know, I don’t really use my triage book. I lean on a lot of colleagues or, you know, we have medical databases or providers and I have questions about something that’s really obscure, but no, I feel much more comfortable and confident. than I did initially, and as Nicole can attest to I definitely struggle with confidence. And I think we’re always working and building on that. But yeah, but like things like this Vivitrol injection, that definitely was, I was really out of my comfort zone, I actually requested that we had another training from the rep so that we could, me and a couple of my co workers could kind of refresh on that. Because I think the climate that we’re maybe heading into in the clinic setting right now. Oh, wow. Okay.

Nicole Whitworth  

So you’re looking ahead, and but you said some other skills that you’ve developed then is knowing how to, to recognize when you need additional training or support, how to find that and advocate for yourself to make sure that you get it, and then move forward, learning new skills, and then you end up a better nurse because of it and build your confidence. So that’s really great. Yeah, I just hear so many nursing students even like in their first semester feeling like well, I don’t know, XYZ. And I’m like, Of course you don’t, your first semester nursing students. And so I think it’s good to hear I worked when I was working in the pediatric or, I still remember there was a 40 year veteran nurse that I worked with one of my co workers. And she told me that she still learned new things every single day. And I’m like, this is a specialty in a specialty is there really that much to learn? And clearly there is there obviously, is in all areas of nursing. So that’s awesome. So let me ask you this, then, what piece of advice do you have any advice that you would do that your puppy dog? Do you have what any advice that you would give to a nursing student who is facing graduation, doesn’t think they want to go into a hospital setting, but maybe they’ve been told, Oh, you can’t go straight into clinic work, you have to do your time on med surge, or you have to grow your skills in a hospital setting before you can go into clinic work? What would you tell a student like that?

Jenn V  

I would say you don’t have anything to lose. I, I mean, definitely when I started out, I think they had wanted, I had maybe a year or two under my belt of clinic work. But I think at some point, somebody needs to give you a chance. And to offer you know, take a chance on you and say you’re worth it, we’re we’re wanting to train you invest their time in you. And if if this said person really does not want to have a have a call to the hospital work, which is fine, it’s not for everyone, I think it’s I think it’s it would be a good opportunity to try and apply for wherever you feel you’re most lead or just anywhere, depending on the climate, which I think is not a problem these days. And I think that just really selling yourself and just being a good people person and being open to you know, if they are this organization is willing to take a chance on you to be open to learning and and things because that’s you know, what happened with me is I ran out of nursing school, I went to private clinic didn’t have any hospital experience or clinic experience. But, you know, they were willing to take a chance on me and it worked out and I did get some, some knowledge. And then I, you know, went on to the organization that I’m with now.

Nicole Whitworth  

Okay, cool. That’s good advice. And I think it’s, I hear you saying like, sell yourself, which requires a little bit of confidence, or at least faking the confidence until you can get it for real. So that’s awesome. And just to try it anyway, to put yourself out there and try it anyway. I know I got a job. I got a nursing job one time by applying for something that I wasn’t qualified for on paper. And I didn’t get it the first time. But the second time they they had a position open they actually came back and asked me to reapply if I was still interested. And I had the the ah, I think it was funny like looking back because the first time I applied the HR person for because it was with the same hospital I was already working at just a different department. They actually asked me Well, are you sure you want to apply? Don’t Are you sure you want to apply? Because you’re not qualified for this? And I was like, Yep, I want to apply anyway. I guess I just I’m stubborn. I don’t take no for an answer. So. Okay, let’s switch gears a little bit and think back to nursing school. And so I know you you referenced this, that you struggled a little bit with confidence back then. Because you actually went through the experience of failing NCLEX multiple times before you were finally successful. So let’s start back with nursing school. How was just the nursing school experience for you?

Unknown Speaker  

Um, so, just to preface I I love. I love school, I still do, but I have no desire at this point to go back. Maybe that will change. But you know, I got my undergrad and then I went on to get some prereqs for nursing school once I decided that’s what I was the direction I was going. And then I went to nursing school, which was just the nursing classes at that point, and clinical, so I really love and enjoy school. But I think nursing school was really difficult for me, I, I think that looking back on it now the clinical piece, like, I feel like I have a good bedside manner I can, you know, really connect with patients, whether it’s on the phone or in person. But back then I am just thinking about things that I was not confident I it was a struggle sometimes. And I didn’t always feel confident, but you just have to put a smile on ask questions, reach out to colleagues, your instructors. So I think that got better. But I think the issue where I really struggled was test taking. I like I said, I’ve always really liked school, but fairly decent at school, but I’m not a good test taker. And I have a lot of like anxiety in general, but then to take tests where you have to get a certain score percentage that made things even worse for me that NCLEX is like multiple guess or pick the best answer. And I think where I really succeeded with, like studying and test taking was when I could when I found the right tutor and the right method, which is needing to verbalize things out loud. And put them in my own words. And I was forced to do that. That’s not something that I would have normally chosen. But when I’m forced to do it, then it’s a little different. And then that really helped me to succeed in nursing school. Yeah, and I did go through a couple tutors. I did reach out for resources talk to professor’s like I was I felt like I was utilizing my options. And it was a struggle to get through nursing school. And but it was worth it.

Nicole Whitworth  

Yeah. Did your school have free tutors available? Or did you have to seek out paid tutors? That’s because I know we we didn’t meet until after you’ve graduated just so that everybody else knows. But but it but do you remember what kind of tutors you had found where they resources through your school or outside your school?

Jenn V  

Yeah, I think I think that one of the tutors I had, it was a resource through the school she had already graduated and passed her NCLEX. So she was a resource through the school. Yes. Okay. And I and I didn’t meet one on one with her for a while, I just think that I needed to find the style that I needed. That worked best for me.

Nicole Whitworth  

Yeah, yeah. And it’s, I’m glad that you were talking about how you had to speak things out loud, because this is so back then I you know, I had my methods of tutoring students, but I’ve even like finessed it even more. And to make it easier for students to understand so that they can figure out the style that works best for them faster. But to do it in a framework that helps them think like a nurse. And so kind of the steps that I walk people through now to think about the material, I call it the silver bullet study system. And so it’s just like, four steps. This is how you think through the information. But the key is to do the act of learning. And so when I hear you say, I had to talk it out, even though I didn’t, that’s not what I would have chosen to do. Because everybody everybody gravitates towards the passive learning, because especially in the US, that’s mostly how school is done for our entire life. Read this, listen to this, watch this, regurgitate it, repeat. But obviously, in nursing school, it’s a lot different, right? Because we have to do those the NCLEX style questions we have to think through there’s a lot more critical thinking skills. And, and so in order to develop those critical thinking skills around the nursing topics, you really do have to you force yourself to use the act of learning techniques, things like he said, putting it in your own words, like that seems kind of simple when you say it, but it’s harder to do than just highlighting it in the book. But if you spend that extra, you know, two minutes maybe to figure out how to put it in your own words. It really does cement it in your brain so much better, so that you can analyze it and apply it later on. verses just maybe you remember it, but you don’t really understand what it means later when, and you can never apply that information to test questions as well, when you just memorize somebody else’s words as you can when you internalize it and make it your own. So, okay, so you made it through nursing school, you get to graduation. Now, you had test anxiety. So I’m sure you were nervous about sitting to take NCLEX for the first time. And you also as I correct me if I’m wrong, but you had a job already, that you were working at the time before you took the NCLEX. Right. Yeah. So you had you were working as a, you know, pre licensure, you know, graduate nurse. And you go, so you, there’s a lot of pressure. There’s a lot of pressure in that situation. You were asked that you were engaged at that time, right, because I remember you and Dustin got married while we were tutoring, I think. Yes. Yeah. After? Yeah. Yes. So you’re engaged. Plus, you had mentioned, like, Dustin has health problems. And I know he was having some flare ups then if I remembering right, and so there’s all these things, just like sitting on your shoulders. And you’re going into NCLEX? Like, the first time you took NCLEX? Did you? Like how afraid were you that you might fail? Or did you kind of think like, Well, yeah, I’m nervous. But that’s not going to happen to me, like what were you? What were your thoughts? What were you thinking?

Unknown Speaker  

That’s so far back!

Nicole Whitworth  

So first of all, let me just point out the fact that it feels like so much when students are listening to this, they’re about to take NCLEX they’re feeling all this, but then no matter how you feel right now, six years from now, you’re gonna be like that a long time ago. With a smile on their face. Yes. Passes. Yeah.

Jenn V  

So I, I mean, I, I can’t remember exactly. But I do know, overall, when I, I had to take the NCLEX more times than I wish I would have liked. Um, but just given that I have test anxiety, that there’s a lot of pressure because of my job situation. And, you know, I had always heard through nursing school and whatnot. And in the prep course, I took the Kaplan prep course after graduation as well. That, you know, the college that I had gone to the pass rate was like, I think at that time was like 100%. So of course, that adds a lot of pressure along with all these other things. And you know, I hear that sometimes you can pass with 75 questions, sometimes like, and then it will just shut off. And then of course, you don’t know until a little bit later, sometimes, you still might pass if you go over 75. So these things are going through my head, I’m trying to block them out. And just like do a lot of self talk, I had to take some breaks, I brought little snacks, you know, you have to go into like a separate room and eat. So like all I had all these strategies that I thought would work. And I took it i generalizing, I think I know, a couple of times, I had gotten gotten around 75 questions. And then it shut off. And then it’s just like a sense of relief that it’s done. But then you’re concerned like hated a pass, you’re hearing all your other colleagues passed. And then you know, you get the results and you didn’t pass and then you have to look over the analysis and see like, what kinds of things can you brush up on? What what do you need more help with, and things to that effect?

Nicole Whitworth  

Now, I will say because I had to, you know, like you said, it’s a lot it was a long time ago now. So I I looked up some of our old emails to refresh my memory on the timeline. And what I had totally forgotten was you had first emailed me when I was actually near the end of my pregnancy with my fourth baby. And I was not taking on any new tutoring students at that time, because it was about to go on maternity leave. So So I think I had told you to check back with me like that fall. And you did. And I think right then I wasn’t right away. But you were so persistent. Like I was looking at those emails and I’m like, Oh my gosh, I can’t believe I didn’t just take her on right away because you were just so persistent and in a polite and kind way but and so that right there told me that you were the type of student I would love to work with anyway, because I will tell you that there is a difference between the type of student who i i tell them because here’s the thing, some students come to me and they want they hope that I can just do it for them. Right. Like I can just spoon feed them some information. And then it’s all magic and they do it. But it’s like what we said, like, you have to be an active participant in the learning process. And that means that there’s some uncomfortable work you have to do in order to know what you prefer, like, but it’s hard. It’s hard. I call it wrestling with the information, right? Wrestling is not fun, it’s hot, sweaty work. And so, but by you just being persistent, and checking back with me, when I told you to check back with me, I was like, Okay, this student is, I know, I knew, that’s what told me that I knew you were going to make it ultimately, because I think by the time we finally started working together, you had already failed NCLEX, either two or three times, I can’t remember I might have been twice but and that you were, you had it scheduled again. But it was like a really short timeline, like maybe a month or less from when we first started. And so when we started working together, I was totally honest with you that I’m like, this might be too short of a timeline. Because as a tutor, obviously, I can’t guarantee results for anybody, I can just provide opportunities to improve, to help you figure out your weak spots, your strengths, and to keep moving forward. And so that’s why I always, always, always tell students now and forever, that if you want to be a nurse, as long as you still have the desire, and you don’t give up, you can become a nurse. You know, there’s no rule that says Your journey has to look a certain way, right, it might take some people longer. So and then, as I recall, you did stick to and take that, take that the test the third time, even that was the short timeline, and you were unsuccessful than two. So we continued working together, though. And that’s the thing, like your determination, to not give up was such like I would, that’s the number one factor in why he succeeded. You know, like, I can’t claim credit for it, because I just said that, I can’t, I can’t do it for you, you know, you have to put in the work. So I have to like, emphasize that everybody the shout out that Jen did it, Jen is the one that put in the work and the effort and didn’t give up and kept wrestling with the information. And I was just kind of like the assisting player to to keep you motivated to help you with your confidence to explain the questions or explain content that you didn’t quite understand when you were studying it on your own. And to help guide you through that and really be like a mentor and a coach to to get you doing what the things that were gonna make you successful and NCLEX. So can you do you remember? Could you share a little bit though about so during this time, because you pass the NCLEX? I think you lost that job, didn’t you that first job, like first and they I think they moved you down to a different position. But I think ultimately, they let you go. Right. Okay. Do you mind talking a little bit about that how you felt about that situation? And what that did you your confidence and things.

Jenn V  

Um, so I was it was when I was working at this private medical clinic that I was it was kind of they hired me on the it’s kind of like the deal is, hey, you graduated nursing school, great. They knew that I hadn’t that I’ve taken the NCLEX a couple of times and have been successful, but they said like the conditions, you know where that you take it, you pass it, and then you know, you can work more in the capacity of the, obviously the RN role because I would have been licensed. So at that time, it had been a couple times and I had been keeping, like my supervisor up to date on what was going on. And I think that I mean, they had to look out for the needs of the clinic. Right? They needed to have someone in the full capacity because there was some things I don’t think I could do. Could do. Or maybe it was just like a temporary basis. I think it was 90 days. I think they really actually I can’t remember the timeframe. But I know that at some point, they were just like kind of on me because they wanted to have a pass and if not, then we have to talk about the next steps and what that would mean in terms of my licensure. So I had taken in probably a couple more times, maybe two more times I hadn’t passed again. And so I basically had to sit down with like a supervisor or whatnot and it was determined that I would have to be move down to a lower role. I did not have so in the clinic, we had our ends and medical assistants. I didn’t have a licensure for having medical assistant license. So I was moved down to like a CNA role And what that essentially meant is that I was rooming patients, which, obviously I do now, you know, I help out my staff. So don’t I don’t have anything against that it was just not what I wanted at that time. I was seeking to be an RN. And so I wasn’t really happy in that role. And that’s where we did part ways with the clinic. I, you know, I did part ways with them, because that’s not what I really wanted. And I was still working towards my NCLEX.

Nicole Whitworth  

Right now. Yeah, so that was unsure a hard decision. And I know a lot of students really struggle when they experience failures, whether it’s like a test or a class, or they fail out of their program, or they fail the NCLEX. They I hear a lot, because that’s actually the number one biggest fear that I hear from nursing students is failure. In all its forms, a lot of what really comes with that I have found is that people feel embarrassed. They feel kind of like the sense of shame that like, oh, well, they shouldn’t have failed. What would you tell a student who is in the situation like, you experienced, like looking back now, six years later, as somebody who just had to, you know, leave their job because they failed? NCLEX? What kind of advice or, or words of wisdom would you offer them?

Jenn V  

I would say just keep, if that’s what you’re truly passionate about, like I’ve gone through nursing school, I knew what the end goal was to become a nurse, it definitely was a bumpy journey in longer than I expected. But I had a lot of family support, my mom was my biggest cheerleader, and still is, you know, my husband, my now husband, Dustin, he was there supporting me. And I’ve worked so hard for this. And so I was going to do whatever I needed to do to get there. And so I think, perseverance and determination, even though it did take even though my, I guess my ego did suffer quite a lot, because I, I knew I could do it. And I think that I just had a barrier of, you know, test taking in, but when I found the right resources, when I found a call, and was asked to do things out of my comfort zone. And when I really truly started, you know, regurgitating the information in my words, but I could understand and put it into practice what that meant. I think that helped me a lot. Along with family support, determination, and just to keep following your dream, because I just, I still am remembering now talking about this, all the the tears and the conversations that I had with my mom, every time I did not pass, and she was just like, You got this, you’re smart, you’re gonna just keep trying again. And, and now I’m, I’ve achieved, you know, that goal, and I pass my NCLEX. And I’m been working for a couple years. And, and I don’t even think back, bringing up a lot of things. I don’t even think back for the times that I didn’t pass because employers, obviously they don’t look they don’t need, they don’t really need to know, they they just want to know you’re a registered nurse that you pass your life, you know, the test stem and go from there. But it’s definitely I think the struggle for some people is more real than others. And I think that makes I can’t speak for anyone else. But I think that that makes me a better person and a better nurse in general, because I fight for what I want. And I think that, you know, I’m a good advocate for people or patients in general.

Nicole Whitworth  

Yeah, that’s, I could absolutely see that in you. Because having gone through that experience, like gives you had the grit, the, the determination, and and you made it. And I definitely saw that in you from day one, as I said, So I hear you saying that. The determination is like a huge factor. Because if you give up, you’re never going to make it to your goal. But keeping your eye on the prize, and that that can help carry you through the difficult spots. Because five years down the road. Nobody cares. You barely remember it yourself. What seems like such a big deal today is going to be just a gust of wind a few years from now.

Jenn V  

Exactly, exactly. Yeah. But when you’re in the thick of it, you you don’t think you can’t even think beyond them. moment, you know about what the future is like. But yes, looking back on it now from a different point of view. I totally agree. And I think that because of all the struggles that I’ve been through, I really think that anyone as long as you have the drive and determination and want to be a nurse, or, you know, whatever it you want to be, in general, maybe have those qualities and perseverance, I think that that your 16 year journey may not always look like what you want it to look like. But as long as you get there, at some point, I think that that’s what matters.

Nicole Whitworth  

Absolutely, yes. I totally agree. 100%. And I try to tell students that all the time and remind them of that. And then the second thing I heard you say that I love, and I think is super important is that you also credit your success to your support system. So for you, that was your mom, and your then fiance. Now husband. And that is such an important thing, because you have all of this other negativity, like, you know, going through that clinic experience and having to make the hard choice to quit that job, when they couldn’t put you in the role that you want it to be in. That’s got to be like, you know, you can have the best outlook in the world, and it’s still going to be a bit of a blow. But when you have these other voices speaking in your ear, encouraging you reminding you that you can do it, then that is such an important factor in counteracting the negativity and reminding you of what you do know deep down because of your determination, you can do this and you will get through it. And they can see that perspective sometimes that you can’t, when you’re in the thick of it, so they can be that voice. I know that’s something that I do for students in the VIP tutoring membership all the time. Like if somebody does experience a failure, or even if they don’t fail, I have a lot of students believe it or not, who say Oh, well, I passed this test. But it was just an easy test. And I’m like, shut your mouth, you pass that test, give yourself a congratulations! And don’t just excuse that, because you think it was easy. It wasn’t easy, it was easy, because you studied hard, and you knew the material. That’s why it was easy. And then also with my VIP tutoring membership now because when we worked together, I was only offering one on one individual tutoring. But clearly, it wasn’t enough for other nursing students who need help, which is why you had to wait so long to, for me to be able to help you because of the things you know me having a baby and things going on in my life. But since then I’ve I’ve created this tutoring membership, where I can provide like the same level of support teach the same skills like the four bullet study system, offer the same kind of mentoring and confidence building and tests, anxiety, like help. But for more students, and for less price, actually, because it’s a membership. And one of the benefits that I didn’t really expect when I started as a membership is that like community support is because some people out there don’t have a supportive mom, or supportive, you know, fiance turned husband. And they feel like they’re on their own doing it, or they have like actively negative people in their life. And so and so with my VIP tutoring membership, like you have this community now like not only me who I’m going to encourage everybody, as if they’re going to be determined, I’m going to be here for that. And I’m going to support them until they reach their goal. But there’s all the other students are so super encouraging. And they will be the ones to like call out, Hey, you’re stuck in the thick of this. Or they’ll like turn around and be like, you know, I failed my first semester. This is my retake of the semester, and I’m doing so much better. You can do this too. You know, you you can get through it. So yeah, so I think that that is such a great reminder that the community support having people in your corner that are encouraging you can help you to stay determined when the going gets tough. So, okay, well, thank you so, so much for chatting with me today, Jen and just sharing more about your story and the bumps and bruises. And I hope that everybody listening, especially if they’re going through like if they’re right in the middle of the bumpy part of their journey right now, I hope that they heard loud and clear your message that five years from now, they’re barely gonna remember this. Okay, they’re going to make it through to and they are going to be fine. So thank you so much. Is there anything else you want to add or any like parting words of wisdom that you’d want to share with a nursing student or anything like that?

Jenn V  

Um, keep pushing forward. Don’t give up. At this point, if when you’re in school and you need extra help, money is no object. You do what you got to do. And you will make it. And each journey looks a little bit different. But the end goal is the same.

Nicole Whitworth  

Yep. That’s wonderful. Yeah. Yeah. And I think he said to like, the employers, nobody cares how many times you took NCLEX. Nobody cares. For other students, like how many times how many nursing schools, they attempted to go to? How many times they failed a class, how long it took them, all they care about is, Are you a nurse now? Can you do the job? So that’s great. Thank you so much, Jen. 

Jenn V

Thanks for having me. 

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I hope you enjoyed hearing from Jenn about her experience passing nursing school, then failing nclex multiple times, losing a job over it, and getting the kind of tutoring support that finally spurred her onto success. And I especially hope that you heard, loud and clear, her message that no matter what struggles you’re going through in nursing school right now, no matter how big and bad they feel…if you keep persevering, seeking the help you need, doing the work, and moving forward, then 5 years from now you’re barely going to remember what happened. And nobody else will care by then, either. So if you’re in the situation, then take a big breath and remember the hope that you can get there, too, just like Jenn did. 

Until next time, Good luck on your nursing journey!

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