Content Review

Osmosis Experiment: Seeing Osmosis in Action (with video!)

What is Osmosis? Before we do an osmosis experiment, let’s first understand what osmosis is. Osmosis is the movement of water through a semi-permeable membrane see the .  During osmosis, the water moves from an area of low-concentration (i.e. where there’s only a little bit of solute) to an area of high-concentration (i.e. where a lot …

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Hypertonic Solution: An Explanation for Nursing Students (UPDATED)

Hypertonic Solution: An Explanation for Nursing Students I’m going to help you understand WHY and HOW a hypertonic solution works so that you can be confident in knowing which situations to use them in for nursing school. If you haven’t already seen the explanation of results from my Osmosis Experiment, make sure to check that out first. …

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Resting Membrane Potential (and How it Can Help You in Med-Surg)

How well do you remember and understand the Resting Membrane Potential in cells?  Get ready to think back to your Biology prerequisite days, because this basic idea is the foundation to understanding nursing concepts as diverse as electrolyte imbalances, muscle movement, and myasthenia gravis. The key to understanding Resting Membrane Potentials is to remember two …

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SNRI’s: Serotonin Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors

When used as anti-depressants, Serotonin Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors (SNRIs) have very similar results as Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs), but their mechanism of action is different.  SNRIs work by preventing the body from “cleaning up” excess serotonin and norepinephrine.  Some common examples of SNRIs are venlafaxine HCL (Effexor) and duloxetine HCL (Cymbalta). Overall, SNRIs are very …

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SSRI’s: Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors

Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI) are currently the most common type of anti-depressants prescribed for depression.  The name is a mouthful, but if you take the time to remember the full-name of the medication class rather than just the acronym, then you will more easily remember what these medications do in the body at an A&P …

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TCA’s: Tricyclic Anti-depressants

Tricyclic antidepressants are one of the oldest anti-depressants available (along with MAOIs).  They work by inhibiting the reuptake of norepinephrine and serotonin by pre-synaptic neurons in the Central Nervous System. Huh? Okay, let’s put this in plain English. Neurons communicate with each other by sending out messages using neurotransmitters like norepinephrine and serotonin.  But not …

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MAOI’s: Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors

When it comes to Pharmacology, many nursing students jump right to trying to memorize specific medications.  In the case of MAOI’s, two commonly used medications are Nardil (phenelzine), and Parnate (tranylcypromine).  But just memorizing specific drug names will not help you very much on an exam or in practice, it’s much more important to learn …

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